Teacher Education, Educational Leadership & Policy ETDs

Publication Date

Spring 5-1977

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to compare the perceptions of junior high school principals and middle school principals concerning the aspects affecting conversion of junior high schools to middle schools.

A questionnaire was used to collect responses from junior high school and middle school principals. The questionnaire, designed to elicit data, was mailed to twenty-two junior high school and middle school principals employed in the Albuquerque Public Schools system. The respondents were divided into two groups: (1) junior high school principals, and (2) middle school principals. The latter were further divided to identify middle school principals who had been involved in a conversion from junior high school to middle school and those middle school principals who were not involved in the process of conversion. The comparisons, when tested by chi-square, showed that significant differences existed in several categories. The findings were:

1. No significant difference existed between the prin­cipals' responses to their perceptions or qualifications and attitudes of administrators.

2. No significant difference existed between the principals' responses to their perceptions of professional development programs.

3. No significant difference existed between the perceptions of junior high and middle school principals concerning in-service programs. However, middle school principals involved in the conversion process, were more concerned about in-service programs than were the prin­cipals of middle school not involved in the conversion process.

4. Principals of junior high schools were less con­cerned about middle school objectives than were principals of middle schools. There was no significant difference in the perceptions of the two middle school sub-groups.

5. No significant difference existed between the

perceptions of junior high school principals and middle school principals concerning curriculum development programs. Middle school principals involved in the process of conversion were less concerned about curriculum than were principals of middle schools who had not yet been involved in the conversion process.

6. No significant difference existed between the principals' responses to perceptions of planning in middle schools.

7. No significant difference existed between the principals' responses to their perceptions of teacher responsibilities.

8. Junior high school principals were less concerned about problems affecting middle schools than were principals of middle schools. There was no significant difference between the two middle school sub-groups.

9. Junior high school principals were less concerned about progressive reorganization than were middle school principals. There was no significant difference between the two middle school sub-groups.

10. Significant differences existed between the junior high and middle school principals concerning aspects of evaluation affecting middle schools. There was also signi­ficant difference between the two middle school sub-groups.

It was concluded that the ten categories listed in this study were recognized by the respondents as ones of considerable importance to the conversion process. Differ­ences that existed between the groups of principals were differences of degrees of concern rather than concern versus non-concern.

Document Type

Dissertation

Level of Degree

Doctoral

First Committee Member (Chair)

George C. Stoumbis

Second Committee Member

Bonner Crawford

Third Committee Member

Howard McConeghey

Fourth Committee Member

Sigmund A. Mierzwa

Fifth Committee Member

Roderic L. Wagoner

Comments

Due to a doubling of the abstract, the roman numeral page numbers in the introductory text repeat. Page 72 is missing from the text but there are no missing pages, only a misnumbering issue.

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