Event Title

Forgotten CO2: measuring diffuse carbon dioxide from volcanoes

Location

Bobo Room, Hodgin Hall, Third Floor

Start Date

8-11-2017 10:45 AM

End Date

8-11-2017 11:45 AM

Description

Carbon dioxide is one of the most abundant gases released by a volcano and can tell us how close magma is to the surface. Most measurements of volcanic carbon dioxide are active emissions, measured from the central vent. Instruments used to identify volcanic gas emissions are placed at the summit of many volcanoes, measuring the ratio of carbon dioxide to other gases. However, active emissions don’t give us the whole story. Carbon dioxide emitted by the magma doesn’t just politely flow towards a central conduit. Instead, it can move through cracks in the surfaces surrounding the volcano, seeping through the soil in a manner known as diffuse degassing. Even when a volcano is not erupting, it is most-likely emitting diffuse carbon dioxide. My research focuses on measuring this forgotten carbon dioxide. Measuring diffuse carbon dioxide is more difficult than sticking an instrument at the summit of the volcano. Oftentimes, there are no visible clues that point to the location of a large diffuse emission. Instead, my field work involves taking individual measurements of carbon dioxide released from the soil all over a volcano. The ability to quantify diffuse emissions is extremely important. Firstly, diffuse carbon dioxide is dangerous. Many people know that the summit of a volcano is not a safe place to be, however, diffuse carbon dioxide can be found seeping through the soil miles from the summit. Carbon dioxide is invisible and odorless. Dangerous amounts of diffuse carbon dioxide can seep through the soil and collect in low-lying areas. Furthermore, estimations of how much volcanic carbon dioxide contributes towards global greenhouse gas emissions often focus on active eruptions and do not include diffuse emissions. This results in an underestimation of the total carbon dioxide produced by volcanoes, important in a world already teetering on the edge of runaway global warming. My research will add to our knowledge of how much diffuse carbon dioxide from volcanoes contributes towards global carbon dioxide emissions.

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Nov 8th, 10:45 AM Nov 8th, 11:45 AM

Forgotten CO2: measuring diffuse carbon dioxide from volcanoes

Bobo Room, Hodgin Hall, Third Floor

Carbon dioxide is one of the most abundant gases released by a volcano and can tell us how close magma is to the surface. Most measurements of volcanic carbon dioxide are active emissions, measured from the central vent. Instruments used to identify volcanic gas emissions are placed at the summit of many volcanoes, measuring the ratio of carbon dioxide to other gases. However, active emissions don’t give us the whole story. Carbon dioxide emitted by the magma doesn’t just politely flow towards a central conduit. Instead, it can move through cracks in the surfaces surrounding the volcano, seeping through the soil in a manner known as diffuse degassing. Even when a volcano is not erupting, it is most-likely emitting diffuse carbon dioxide. My research focuses on measuring this forgotten carbon dioxide. Measuring diffuse carbon dioxide is more difficult than sticking an instrument at the summit of the volcano. Oftentimes, there are no visible clues that point to the location of a large diffuse emission. Instead, my field work involves taking individual measurements of carbon dioxide released from the soil all over a volcano. The ability to quantify diffuse emissions is extremely important. Firstly, diffuse carbon dioxide is dangerous. Many people know that the summit of a volcano is not a safe place to be, however, diffuse carbon dioxide can be found seeping through the soil miles from the summit. Carbon dioxide is invisible and odorless. Dangerous amounts of diffuse carbon dioxide can seep through the soil and collect in low-lying areas. Furthermore, estimations of how much volcanic carbon dioxide contributes towards global greenhouse gas emissions often focus on active eruptions and do not include diffuse emissions. This results in an underestimation of the total carbon dioxide produced by volcanoes, important in a world already teetering on the edge of runaway global warming. My research will add to our knowledge of how much diffuse carbon dioxide from volcanoes contributes towards global carbon dioxide emissions.