Language, Literacy, and Sociocultural Studies ETDs

Publication Date

6-25-2010

Abstract

This thesis sheds light on the multiple identities of the Hispano people of the Española Valley in Northern New Mexico, a population that to outsiders is commonly misunderstood and stereotyped. It is a population regarded with some mystery, awe, and admiration, as well as fear and hatred, a population that even to itself sometimes remains an enigma. The qualitative study undertaken examined the culture and life experiences of 11 native Hispanics living in this community and explored their perspectives on gender and generational differences. Data were collected through individual, semi-structured interviews, which were then analyzed through a recursive process of reading transcripts, coding and categorizing. The themes that emerged, including but not limited to land, religion, education and economics, are presented, and implications and recommendations are discussed.

Keywords

Hispanic Americans--New Mexico--Espanola Valley--Ethnic identity, Hispanic Americans--New Mexico--Espanola Valley--Social life and customs, Ethnology--New Mexico--Espanola Valley

Sponsors

Emma Showman Scholarship Office of Graduate Studies RPT Grant

Document Type

Thesis

Language

English

Level of Degree

Masters

Department Name

Language, Literacy, and Sociocultural Studies

First Advisor

Noll, Elizabeth

Second Advisor

Martinez, Glenabah

First Committee Member (Chair)

Burns Daniels, Elaine

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