Publication Date

5-1-2012

Abstract

Geospatial modeling of ancient landscapes for predictive scientific research and hypothesis testing is an important emerging approach in contemporary archaeology. This doctoral dissertation is comprised of three published North American case studies that clearly demonstrate the value of predictive geospatial modeling to address explicit goals of contemporary archaeological research, conservation and cultural resource management. The case studies consist of a GIS-based prioritization analysis of natural and cultural resources conservation value in the Galisteo Basin of north-central New Mexico, an archaeological sensitivity analysis (site-discovery potential) for the state of Vermont, and a predictive model of agricultural potential during the Bonito Phase (ca. AD 850 to 1150) in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. These studies contribute to the growing reliance on quantitative geospatial modeling in the social sciences.

Keywords

GIS, Geospatial, Archaeology, Predicitive Modeling, Vermont, Galisteo Basin, Chaco Canyon, LiDAR, suitability, prehistoric agriculture

Sponsors

National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (National Science Foundation)

Document Type

Dissertation

Language

English

Degree Name

Anthropology

Level of Degree

Doctoral

Department Name

UNM Department of Anthropology

First Advisor

Wills, Wirt

First Committee Member (Chair)

Crown, Patricia

Second Committee Member

Prufer, Keith

Third Committee Member

Wawrzyniec, Tim

Included in

Anthropology Commons

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