Summary Information
Reptile Populations at the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico (1989-1990)
Creator:
Individual: Howard Snell
Organization: SEV LTER
Email: snell@unm.edu
Associated Party:
Individual: Michelle Murillo
Organization: SEV LTER
Role: data manager
Language: english
Abstract:
Reptile populations were sampled in spring and summer in various habitats: grassland, creosote shrubland, pinyon-juniper woodland, cottonwood forest, subalpine forest, and subalpine meadow. On 18 sites mark-release methods were used; on 12 sites, all animals were kept for museum specimens. Museum specimen preparations included skulls, whole skeletons, and alcohol preservations; all specimens had tissue samples (liver, heart) taken for ultra-cold preservations for genetic analyses; some were karyotyped. All museum specimens were checked for internal parasites.
Keywords:
Keyword: populations
Keyword Thesaurus: Core Areas
Keywords:
Keyword: habitats
Keyword: species
Keyword: biology
Keyword: genetics
Keyword: taxonomy
Keyword: biodiversity
Keyword: species diversity
Keyword: population and community properties
Keyword: abundance
Keyword: diversity
Keyword: field methods
Keyword: monitoring
Keyword: trapping
Keyword: ecosystems
Keyword: terrestrial ecosystems
Keyword: deserts
Keyword: organisms
Keyword: vertebrates
Keyword: reptiles
Keyword: lizards
Keyword Thesaurus: LTER Controlled Vocabulary
Additional Information:
This data set was obtained from the Mac computer of Howard Snell, Asst. Professor at UNM. All data from years 1989 and 1990, were entered by him or his assistants. As 1989 and 1990 data sets were in separate files, they have been merged together as one file in this data set. The format was changed to "rdb" format in order to allow the data set to be used on the Sevilleta system. File begin edit: May 28, Michelle L. Murillo: changing to rdb format.File end edit: May 28, Michelle L. Murillo.Note: holder, measurer, recorder taken out, can be found on original data sheets.
Intellectual Rights:
Data Policies
This dataset is released to the public and may be freely downloaded. Please keep the designated Contact person informed of any plans to use the dataset. Consultation or collaboration with the original investigators is strongly encouraged. Publications and data products that make use of the dataset must include proper acknowledgement of the Sevilleta LTER. Datasets must be cited as in the example below. Muldavin, E. 2004. Sevilleta LTER Fertilizer NPP Study Dataset. Albuquerque, NM: Sevilleta Long Term Ecological Research Site Database: SEV155. (Date of download) A copy of any publications using these data must be supplied to the Sevilleta LTER Information Manager.
Distribution:
Online:
URL: http://sev.lternet.edu/node/3584
Coverage:
Geographic Goverage:
Geographic Description: Location: Five Points is the area which encompasses the Five Points Black Grama and Five Points Creosote Core study sites and falls along the transition between Chihuahuan Desert Scrub and Desert Grassland habitats. Both sites are subject to intensive research activity, including NPP measurement, phenology observation, pollinator diversity studies, and ground dwelling arthropod and rodent population assessments. There are drought rain-out shelters in both the Black Grama and Creosote sites, as well as the mixed-ecotone, with co-located ET Towers.Vegetation: The Five Points Creosote site is characterized as Chihuahuan Desert Scrub, dominated by a creosotebush overstory with broom snakeweed, purple pricklypear (O. macrocentra) and soapweed yucca as notable shrubs. The site is also characterized by numerous dense grass dominated patches, reflecting proximity to the Five Points Black Grama site and the relatively recent appearance of creosotebush. Dominant grasses are black grama, fluffgrass (Dasyochloa pulchellum), burrograss (Scleropogon brevifolia), bush muhly (M. porteri), and galleta (Pleuraphis jamesii). Notable forb species include field bahia (Bahia absinthifolia), baby aster (Chaetopappa ericoides), plains hiddenflower (Cryptantha crassisepala), Indian rushpea (Hoffmannseggia glauca), Fendlers bladderpod (Lesquerella fendleri), and globemallow (Sphaeralcea spp.). Five Points Black Grama habitat is ecotonal in nature, bordering Chihuahuan Desert Scrub at its southern extent and Plains-Mesa Grassland at its northern, more mesic boundary. There is also a significant presence of shrubs, particularly broom snakeweed (Gutierrezia sarothrae), along with less abundant fourwing saltbush (Atriplex canescens), Mormon tea (Ephedra torreyana), winterfat (Krascheninnikovia lanata), tree cholla (Opuntia imbricata), club cholla (O. clavata), desert pricklypear (O. phaeacantha), soapweed yucca (Yucca glauca), and what are presumed to be encroaching, yet sparsely distributed, creosotebush (Larrea tridentata). Characteristically, the dominant grass is black grama (Bouteloua eriopoda). Spike, sand, and mesa dropseed grasses (Sporobolus contractus, S. cryptandrus, S. flexuosus) and sand muhly (Muhlenbergia arenicola) could be considered co-dominant throughout, along with blue grama (B. gracilis) in a more mesic, shallow swale on the site. Notable forb species include trailing four o’clock (Allionia incarnata), horn loco milkvetch (Astragalus missouriensis), sawtooth spurge (Chamaesyce serrula), plains hiddenflower (Cryptantha crassisepala), blunt tansymustard (Descarania obtusa), wooly plaintain (Plantago patagonica), globemallow (Sphaeralcea wrightii), and mouse ear (Tidestromia lanuginosa)., siteid: 2
Bounding Coordinates:
West Bounding Coordinates: 106.717
East Bounding Coordinates: 106.717
North Bounding Coordinates: 34.3381
South Bounding Coordinates: 34.3381
Bounding Altitude:
Altitude Minimum: 1615
Altitude Maximum: 1615
Altitude Units: meter
Geographic Goverage:
Geographic Description: Location: Five Points Black Grama is on the transition between Chihuahuan Desert Scrub and Desert Grassland habitat. The site is subject to intensive research activity, including assessments of net primary productivity, phenology, and pollinator diversity, amongst other projects.  It is the site of the unburned black grama (GU) component of the Burn NPP study. On August 4, 2009, a lightning-initiated fire began on the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge. By August 5, 2009, the fire had reached the Five Points Black Grama site.  Portions of this site were burned, but not the entirety.  See individual projects for further information on the effects of the burn.  Vegetation: The Five Points Black Grama site is ecotonal in nature, bordering Chihuahuan Desert Scrub at its southern extent and Plains-Mesa Grassland at its northern, more mesic boundary. Characteristically, the dominant grass is black grama (Bouteloua eriopoda).,
Bounding Coordinates:
West Bounding Coordinates: -106.736
East Bounding Coordinates: -106.736
North Bounding Coordinates: 34.3331
South Bounding Coordinates: 34.3331
Bounding Altitude:
Altitude Minimum: 1615
Altitude Maximum: 1615
Altitude Units: meter
Geographic Goverage:
Geographic Description: Location: The Five Points area emcompasses both the Five Points Black Grama and Five Points Creosote study sites.  Five Points falls along the transition between the Chihuahuan Desert Scrub and Desert Grassland habitats.  Both core sites are subject to intensive research activities, including NPP measurements, phenology observations, pollinator diversity studies, and ground dwelling arthropod and rodent population assessments.  There are rain-out shelters for drought studies in both the Five Points Black Grama and Five Points Creosote sites.Vegetation: The Five Points Creosote site is characterized as Chihuahuan Desert Scrub, dominated by a creosote overstory, with broom snakeweed, purple pricklypear (Opuntia macrocentra), and soapweed yucca as co-occurring shrubs. The site is also characterized by numerous, dense, grass-dominated patches, reflecting proximity to the Five Points Black Grama Site. Dominant grasses are black grama, fluffgrass (Dasyochloa pulchellum), burrograss (Scleropogon brevifolia), bushmuhly (Muhlenbergia porteri), and galleta (Pleuraphis jamesii). Notable forbs include field bahia (Bahia absinthifolia), baby aster (Chaetopappa ericoides), plains hiddenflower (Cryptantha crassisepala), Indian rushpea (Hoffmannseggia glauca), Fendlers bladderpod (Lesquerella fendleri), and globemallows (Sphaeralcea spp.)., siteid: 3
Bounding Coordinates:
West Bounding Coordinates: -106.7358
East Bounding Coordinates: -106.7358
North Bounding Coordinates: 34.3331
South Bounding Coordinates: 34.3331
Bounding Altitude:
Altitude Minimum: 1615
Altitude Maximum: 1615
Altitude Units: meter
Geographic Goverage:
Geographic Description: Location: The Rio Salado is an ephemeral tributary of the Rio Grande on the west side of the Sevilleta NWR, flowing west by northwest to east by southeast. Rio Salado Grassland and Rio Salado Larrea are two study sites established in 1989. These sites were established as counterparts to sites at Five Points. Between 1989 and 1998, vegetation, litter decomposition, and ground dwelling arthropod and rodent populations were studied at both sites. Core studies at these sites were largely terminated in 1998, although rodent populations are still monitored at the Rio Salado Larrea site because the Small Mammal Exclosure Study's Larrea plots are co-located there. Rio Salado Grassland is the location Met Station 44.The Rio Salado study sites are accessed by taking the San Acacia exit, going west and then taking the frontage road back north to the Sevilleta NWR gate.  After entering the refuge turn left after 0.2 mi and take this road 1.4 mi to a "T" in the road at the power lines.  An earthen berm stops road travel here and the met station is located about 300 m west on the blocked road. Vegetation: The Rio Salado Larrea site is characterized as Chihuahuan Desert Scrub, dominated by creosotebush (Larrea tridentata), with honey mesquite, fourwing saltbush, purple pricklypear (O. macrocentra), and broom snakeweed as co-occurring shrubs. Dominant grasses are black grama (Bouteloua eriopoda), galleta (Pleuraphis jamesii), burrograss (Scleropogon brevifolia), and fluffgrass (Dasyochloa pulchellum). Common forb species include desert holly (Acourtia nana), spectaclepod (Dimorphocarpa spp.), blackfoot daisey (Melampodium leucanthum), twinleaf (Senna bauhinoides), globemallow (Sphaeralcea wrightii), and plains hiddenflower (Cryptantha crassisepala). While individual creosote bushes tend to be larger, overall plant cover is less than at the creosote core site at Five Points, with more exposed embedded stones and gravel on the soil surface, creating a pavement-like appearance.,
Bounding Coordinates:
West Bounding Coordinates: 106.9267
East Bounding Coordinates: 106.9267
North Bounding Coordinates: 34.296
South Bounding Coordinates: 34.296
Bounding Altitude:
Altitude Minimum: 1503
Altitude Maximum: 1503
Altitude Units: meter
Geographic Goverage:
Geographic Description: Location: The Rio Salado is an ephemeral tributary of the Rio Grande on the west side of the Sevilleta NWR, flowing west by northwest to east by southeast. Rio Salado Grassland and Rio Salado Larrea are two study sites established in 1989. These sites were established as counterparts to sites at Five Points. Between 1989 and 1998, vegetation, litter decomposition, and ground dwelling arthropod and rodent populations were studied at both sites. Core studies at these sites were largely terminated in 1998, although rodent populations are still monitored at the Rio Salado Larrea site as the Small Mammal Exclosure Study's Larrea plots are co-located there. Rio Salado Grassland is the location of Met Station 44. The Rio Salado study sites are accessed by taking the San Acacia exit, going west and then taking the frontage road back north to the Sevilleta NWR gate.  After entering the refuge turn left after 0.2 mi and take this road 1.4 mi to a "T" in the road at the power lines.  An earthen berm stops road travel here and the met station is located about 300 m west on the blocked road.   Vegetation: The Rio Salado Grassland site is Plains-Mesa Sand Scrub habitat characterized by stabilized deep-sand dominated by coppice dunes of honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa). Co-dominant shrubs are sand sagebrush (Artemesia filifolia) and fourwing saltbush (Atriplex canescens), with winterfat (Krascheninnikovia lanata), Mormon tea (Ephedra torreyana), broom indigobush (Psorothamnus scoparius), soapweed yucca (Yucca glauca), and broom snakeweed (Gutierrezia sarothrae) as other notable shrubs. One-seed juniper (Juniperus monosperma) is present as well, especially along shallow washes. Compared to the Black Grama Core Site, grass cover is sparse and dominated by poverty threeawn (Aristida divaricata), Indian ricegrass (Oryzopsis hymenoides), mesa and spike dropseed (Sporobolus cryptandrus and S. contractus), as well as patches of black grama (Bouteloua eriopoda). Notable forbs included spectaclepod (Dimorphocarpa wislizenii), tansy aster (Machaeranthera tanacetifolia), desert marigold (Baileya multiradiata), Abert buckwheat (Eriogonum abertianum), dwarf gilia (Ipomopsis pumila), rattlesnake weed (Chamaesyce albomarginata), blunt tansymustard (Descarania obtusa), plains hiddenflower (Cryptantha crassisepala), and Rocky Mountain zinnia (Zinnia grandiflora)., siteid: 13
Bounding Coordinates:
West Bounding Coordinates: -106.9267
East Bounding Coordinates: -106.9267
North Bounding Coordinates: 34.269
South Bounding Coordinates: 34.269
Bounding Altitude:
Altitude Minimum: 1503
Altitude Maximum: 1503
Altitude Units: meter
Geographic Goverage:
Geographic Description: Location: Ladron Foothills sites include Red Tank and Two-22 in the foothills of the Sierra Ladrones on the West side of the refuge.Soils: Soils in the Arroyo Riparian area are loose granitic gravel with many rocks and boulders., Vegetation: Two-22 site is characterized as Juniper Savanna/Arroyo Riparian (Dick-Peddie 1993). Two-22 trapping webs span 2 two vegetation types. The upland Juniper Savanna portion of the site is dominated by widely scattered, relatively small stature one-seed Juniper. Other shrubs are sparse, including scrub liveoak, skunkbush, tree cholla, pricklypear, and banana and soapweed yucca. Rocky open spaces are dominated by black, hairy, and blue grama. The lower Arroyo Riparian area consists of a more dense, more diverse vegetation, dominated by large specimens of scrub liveoak, one-seed juniper and Apache plume, as well as tree cholla, Engelman cholla (O. engelmanii), pricklypear, broom snakeweed, tarragon (Artemesia dracunculus), sacahuista, chamisa (Chrysothamnus nauseosus), fourwing saltbush, wolfberry (Lycium pallidum), and skunkbush. Grass diversity is relatively high and dominated by blue grama and bush muhly.,
Bounding Coordinates:
West Bounding Coordinates: -107.03
East Bounding Coordinates: -107.03
North Bounding Coordinates: 34.418
South Bounding Coordinates: 34.418
Bounding Altitude:
Altitude Minimum: 1766
Altitude Maximum: 1766
Altitude Units: meter
Temporal Coverage:
Date Range:
Begin Date:
Calendar Date: 1989-04-01
End Date:
Calendar Date: 1991-04-01
Contact:
Position Title: Information Manager
Organization: LTER Network Office
Physical Address:
Delivery Address: UNM Biology Department, MSC03-2020
Delivery Address: 1 University of New Mexico
City: Albuquerque
Locality: NM
Postal Code: 87131-0001
Phone: USA
Phone: 505 277-2535
Phone: 505 277-2541
Email: tech-support@lternet.edu
URL: http://www.lternet.edu
Contact:
Individual: Information Manager Sevilleta LTER
Organization: SEV LTER
Physical Address:
Delivery Address: 1 University of New Mexico
City: Albuquerque
Postal Code: 87131
Phone: (505) 277-2109
Phone: (505) 277.5355
Email: data-use@sevilleta.unm.edu
Publication Place: Sevilleta LTER
Method Step:
Description:
Livetrapping of lizards and snakes on the Sevilleta was done by using pitfall traps connected with drift fences.  A pitfall trap consisted of two large ( 10) cans connected end to end resulting in a trap approximately 44 cm deep and 15 cm in diameter.  The traps were inserted into the ground so the tops are flush.  Two pitfalls were placed into the ground approximately 6 meters apart and connected with a 12 cm tall aluminum flashing fence.  The fence guided the reptiles into the pitfall traps.There were 24 pitfall traps per web (12 sets) totaling 120 per site. Seventy-two of these were for mark and recapture studies, while the remaining 48 werefor the collection of museum specimens.The pitfalls were covered with aluminum flashing lids that sit approximately 2.5 cm off the ground.  The lids provided complete shade and protection from precipitation.  The trap floors were also punctured to permit drainage if necessary.The pitfall traps were opened for three weeks at a time, and were checked every two or three days by a crew of two to five.  At the end of the three weeks they were closed by covering the openings with a square ceramic tile, 20 cm per side.  The edges of the tiles were then covered with dirt as an extra safeguard against penetration. All pitfalls were checked for the presence of animals by removing the aluminum lids and visually inspecting each trap's interior.  Lizards found in the traps on the collection webs were removed from the traps, placed in plastic bags with an adequate supply of air, and transported to the lab for processing.  Lizards found in pitfalls on mark-recapture webs were removed by hand, then identified to species level, checked for previous capture and individual identification marks, measured, weighed and sexed.  The lizards were toe-clipped with no more than two toes cut per foot, and the longest toes on the hind feet left intact.All snakes were identified to species level, and non-venomous snakes were measured and weighed but not marked because so few are captured. Venomous snakes were removed from pitfalls by the head animal technician using a "snake stick" which enabled the user to handle snakes safely without injury to the snake.All lizards and snakes are released at the exact location of capture.
Data Table:
Entity Name: sev009_reptilepopns_09072011.txt
Object Name: sev009_reptilepopns_09072011.txt
Data Format:
Text Format:
Number of Header Lines: 1
Number of Footer Lines: 0
Record Delimiter: \n
Attribute Orientation: column
Simple Delimited:
Field Delimiter: ,
Distribution:
Online:
URL: https://pasta.lternet.edu/package/data/eml/knb-lter-sev/9/277527/f7cebac990c34d19be11a856484aae11
Coverage:
Temporal Coverage:
Date Range:
Begin Date:
Calendar Date: 1989-01-01
End Date:
Calendar Date: 1991-01-01
Attribute List:
Attribute Name: year
Attribute Label: year
Attribute Definition: The year in which data was collected.
Storage Type: date
Measurement Scale:
Datetime:
Format String: YYYY
Attribute Name: season
Attribute Label: season
Attribute Definition: The season in which the data were collected.
Storage Type: string
Measurement Scale:
Nominal:
Non Numeric Domain:
Enumerated Domain:
Code Definition:
Code: 1
Definition: spring
Code Definition:
Code: 2
Definition: fall
Attribute Name: location
Attribute Label: location
Attribute Definition: The site at which sampling occurred.
Storage Type: string
Measurement Scale:
Nominal:
Non Numeric Domain:
Enumerated Domain:
Code Definition:
Code: DW
Definition: Deep Well
Code Definition:
Code: FP
Definition: Five Points
Attribute Name: web
Attribute Label: web
Attribute Definition: The number of the web being sampled, which can range from 1-5 depending on site and project.
Storage Type: string
Measurement Scale:
Nominal:
Non Numeric Domain:
Text Domain:
Definition: The number of the web being sampled, which can range from 1-5 depending on site and project.
Attribute Name: spoke
Attribute Label: spoke
Attribute Definition: Radial line of trapping web: lines A-L.
Storage Type: string
Measurement Scale:
Nominal:
Non Numeric Domain:
Text Domain:
Definition: Radial line of trapping web: lines A-L.
Attribute Name: dis
Attribute Label: dis
Attribute Definition: Linear distance in meters to trap location from center web.
Measurement Scale:
Ratio:
Unit:
Custom Unit: meters
Numeric Domain:
Number Type: real
Attribute Name: species
Attribute Label: species
Attribute Definition: Four letter code representing the genus and species of individual collected.
Storage Type: string
Measurement Scale:
Nominal:
Non Numeric Domain:
Text Domain:
Definition: Four letter code representing the genus and species of individual collected.
Attribute Name: id#
Attribute Label: id#
Attribute Definition: The number given to each indiviual animal
Storage Type: string
Measurement Scale:
Nominal:
Non Numeric Domain:
Text Domain:
Definition: The number given to each indiviual animal
Attribute Name: recap
Attribute Label: recap
Attribute Definition: An indication if the animal was a recapture or not
Storage Type: string
Measurement Scale:
Nominal:
Non Numeric Domain:
Enumerated Domain:
Code Definition:
Code: y
Definition: a recapture from that week only
Code Definition:
Code: n
Definition: not a recapture
Attribute Name: sex
Attribute Label: sex
Attribute Definition: Gender of animal (M or F)
Storage Type: string
Measurement Scale:
Nominal:
Non Numeric Domain:
Text Domain:
Definition: Gender of animal (M or F)
Attribute Name: svl
Attribute Label: svl
Attribute Definition: Snout-vent length
Measurement Scale:
Ratio:
Unit:
Custom Unit: centimeters
Numeric Domain:
Number Type: real
Attribute Name: ttl
Attribute Label: ttl
Attribute Definition: Total tail length
Measurement Scale:
Ratio:
Unit:
Custom Unit: centimeters
Numeric Domain:
Number Type: real
Attribute Name: rtl
Attribute Label: rtl
Attribute Definition: Regenerated tail length
Measurement Scale:
Ratio:
Unit:
Custom Unit: centimeters
Numeric Domain:
Number Type: real
Attribute Name: t?
Attribute Label: t?
Attribute Definition: Yes or no regenerated tail (y or n)
Storage Type: string
Measurement Scale:
Nominal:
Non Numeric Domain:
Text Domain:
Definition: Yes or no regenerated tail (y or n)
Attribute Name: hll
Attribute Label: hll
Attribute Definition: Hind leg length
Measurement Scale:
Ratio:
Unit:
Custom Unit: centimeters
Numeric Domain:
Number Type: real
Attribute Name: fll
Attribute Label: fll
Attribute Definition: Fore leg length
Measurement Scale:
Ratio:
Unit:
Custom Unit: centimeters
Numeric Domain:
Number Type: real
Attribute Name: mass
Attribute Label: mass
Attribute Definition: Weight determined to nearest gram using a pesola scale
Measurement Scale:
Ratio:
Unit:
Standard Unit: gram
Precision: 0.1
Numeric Domain:
Number Type: real
Attribute Name: nk number
Attribute Label: nk#
Attribute Definition: New Mexico karyotype number (assigned by the museum of southwestern biology)
Storage Type: string
Measurement Scale:
Nominal:
Non Numeric Domain:
Text Domain:
Definition: New Mexico karyotype number (assigned by the museum of southwestern biology)
Attribute Name: comments
Attribute Label: comments
Attribute Definition: Comments regarding the observation
Storage Type: string
Measurement Scale:
Nominal:
Non Numeric Domain:
Text Domain:
Definition: Comments regarding the observation