Sociology ETDs

Publication Date

2-9-2011

Abstract

Domestic violence occurs across all ethnic and racial groups and affects women of all ages and socio-economic backgrounds. However, research shows that battered women of Latin American descent are less likely to seek help from either formal or informal sources (West, Kantor, & Jasinski, 1998) and research done on Latina women in shelters suggest that these women are more likely to stay longer in an abusive relationship before seeking help (Torres, 1991). To contribute to the growing body of literature on race and domestic violence, this research will examine particular situational and individual-specific characteristics of domestic violence incidents experienced by Latina immigrant women living in Memphis, Tennessee. Based on a sample of 568 immigrant Latina women, this research seeks to determine whether particular situational and individual-specific characteristics of domestic violence incidents affect whether the Latina victims will report to the police. Despite the multitude of possible barriers to reporting domestic victimization to the police, many of the hypotheses have not been studied systematically.

Degree Name

Sociology

Level of Degree

Doctoral

Department Name

Sociology

First Advisor

Tiano, Susan

First Committee Member (Chair)

Fiala, Robert

Second Committee Member

Lopez, Nancy

Third Committee Member

Williams, Yaschica

Keywords

Hispanic American women--Abuse 0f--Tennessee--Memphis, Women immigrants--Abuse of--Tennessee--Memphis, Victims of family violence--Tennessee--Memphis--Psychology, Abused women--Tennessee--Memphis--Psychology, Wife abuse--Tennessee--Memphis--Psychological aspects

Language

English

Document Type

Dissertation

Share

COinS