Event Title

Community Participation and Government Support for Natural Disaster Relief and Recovery Process in Ecuador After The 2016 Earthquake

Location

Bobo Room, Hodgin Hall, Third Floor

Start Date

8-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

8-11-2017 1:30 PM

Description

On April 16, 2016, a strong earthquake rated 7.8 magnitude in Richter scale shook Ecuador. The epicenter was located 12.4 miles offshore of the west coast of northern Ecuador. Many cities were affected and dozens of towns were destroyed. Close to a thousand-people lost their lives, many material belongings were lost and family members have dispersed to other communities. This study analyzes how external help can influence the change of a culture during reconstruction of a town after a natural disaster. It also examines urban planning and economic development strategies for recovery after a natural disaster and uses the 2016 earthquake in Canoa, Ecuador as an element for analysis. Canoa is a coastal rural parish located 56 miles away from the epicenter with an estimated population of 6,887 people (Ecuador Census 2010) within an area of in 148.6 sq. miles. When a country faces a strong natural disaster, a variety of dilemmas takes place in its re-development. Not only infrastructure and buildings have to be rebuilt but also community identity and culture is affected. When external support, such as local or central government and, NGO´s or volunteers take part of a recovery process, they influenced the affected community. As a framework for this research, global case studies affected by earthquakes will be analyzed such as Iran 2003, Chile 2010, and Nepal 2015. The recovery management approaches in these countries and Canoa will be examined to find common patterns in physical and cultural identity recovery. The research findings from this study will provide recommendations for disaster recovery to the national government of Ecuador. As well as proposals for best practices for community involvement and planning in the reconstruction of a city in decision making, urban regulations, organization and coordination after an earthquake.

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Nov 8th, 12:30 PM Nov 8th, 1:30 PM

Community Participation and Government Support for Natural Disaster Relief and Recovery Process in Ecuador After The 2016 Earthquake

Bobo Room, Hodgin Hall, Third Floor

On April 16, 2016, a strong earthquake rated 7.8 magnitude in Richter scale shook Ecuador. The epicenter was located 12.4 miles offshore of the west coast of northern Ecuador. Many cities were affected and dozens of towns were destroyed. Close to a thousand-people lost their lives, many material belongings were lost and family members have dispersed to other communities. This study analyzes how external help can influence the change of a culture during reconstruction of a town after a natural disaster. It also examines urban planning and economic development strategies for recovery after a natural disaster and uses the 2016 earthquake in Canoa, Ecuador as an element for analysis. Canoa is a coastal rural parish located 56 miles away from the epicenter with an estimated population of 6,887 people (Ecuador Census 2010) within an area of in 148.6 sq. miles. When a country faces a strong natural disaster, a variety of dilemmas takes place in its re-development. Not only infrastructure and buildings have to be rebuilt but also community identity and culture is affected. When external support, such as local or central government and, NGO´s or volunteers take part of a recovery process, they influenced the affected community. As a framework for this research, global case studies affected by earthquakes will be analyzed such as Iran 2003, Chile 2010, and Nepal 2015. The recovery management approaches in these countries and Canoa will be examined to find common patterns in physical and cultural identity recovery. The research findings from this study will provide recommendations for disaster recovery to the national government of Ecuador. As well as proposals for best practices for community involvement and planning in the reconstruction of a city in decision making, urban regulations, organization and coordination after an earthquake.