Psychology ETDs

Publication Date

9-9-2010

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between participants level of psychological distress and their attempts to control their problematic alcohol consumption in a randomized clinical trial comparing two web-based Behavioral Self-Control Training (BSCT) interventions. Potential participants in the trial were screened for both severe mental illness and symptoms of alcohol dependence. Based on prevailing theories, as well as research on individuals diagnosed with co-morbid anxious or mood disorders with alcohol use disorders, it was hypothesized that participants reporting higher levels of clinical distress would have worse outcomes. However, the results of this trial demonstrated that participants reporting higher levels of clinical distress at intake, as assessed by the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI), were more successful and reducing both number of drinks they consumed per drinking occasion as well as the number of days they drank per drinking period at 3 and 12-month follow-up, relative to those who reported less or no clinical distress at intake.

Degree Name

Psychology

Level of Degree

Masters

Department Name

Psychology

First Advisor

Dougher, Michael

First Committee Member (Chair)

Witherington, David

Second Committee Member

Dougher, Michael

Third Committee Member

Gangestadt, Steve

Language

English

Keywords

Controlled drinking--Psychological aspects, Alcoholism--Psychological aspects, Distress (Psychology)--Social aspects.

Document Type

Thesis

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