Physics & Astronomy ETDs

Publication Date

5-29-1961

Abstract

This phenomenon of the spray produced by bursting bubbles at liquid surfaces is certainly familiar to drinkers of carbonated soda pop, champagne and other effervescent liquids. This same phenomenon has been observed at ocean surfaces. Small bubbles, some of which originate at great depths, rise to the surface and break; tiny droplet is thrown upward from most of the imploding bubbles. Some of these droplets may be caught and carried into the atmosphere by winds sweeping along the surface. The droplets evaporate but leave small particles of salt suspended in the air; the particles then serve as condensation nuclei and are of great importance in the formation of rain and fog.

The purpose of this paper is to examine this phenomenon, considering in particular the energies of the droplets as a function of the solution and surface tension.

Degree Name

Physics

Level of Degree

Masters

Department Name

Physics & Astronomy

First Committee Member (Chair)

John R. Green

Second Committee Member

Roy Thomas

Third Committee Member

N/A

Language

English

Document Type

Thesis

Share

COinS