Author

David Glavin

Publication Date

8-27-2012

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between quizzing and student success in an introductory college level statistics course. Demographic and student performance data were collected from a 100-level introductory Statistics course at the University of New Mexico during the Fall 2011 semester. Two statistical models were developed to determine if quizzing is related to student success as measured by final letter grades and final exam scores. Predictive modeling to determine the relationship between quizzing and students final exam scores using a Hierarchical Linear Model (HLM) found quizzing to be marginally significant (p-value = 0.0567). Probabilistic modeling using logistic regression to predict if a student passes the course with a grade of C or higher yielded an odds ratio of 6.013 (95% Wald CI: 2.030, 17.813) for students who were given periodic quizzes versus students who were not given quizzes, while holding all other variables in the model constant. Results indicate that quizzing is positively associated with student performance.

Degree Name

Statistics

Level of Degree

Masters

Department Name

Mathematics & Statistics

First Advisor

Umland, Kristin

First Committee Member (Chair)

Sonksen, Michael

Second Committee Member

Nakamaye, Michael

Language

English

Keywords

Ability--Testing--EvAluation, Statistics--Ability testing--Psychological aspects, Academic achievement--Psychological aspects.

Document Type

Thesis

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