Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this case report is to determine if, in patients with myoclonus post-anoxic brain injury does rehabilitation therapies in conjunction with pharmaceutical therapy, compared to pharmaceutical therapy alone, increase functional outcomes. CASE DESCRIPTION: Patient is a 43-year-old female who was originally admitted to an ICU with a change in mental status secondary to an overdose of migraine medication, requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation; receiving the diagnosis of severe anoxic brain injury and was in a coma, later regained consciousness, and at that time developed myoclonus post-anoxic brain injury. She was referred to Physical Therapy for evaluation and treatment of the secondary effects of the severe anoxic brain injury, specifically for the severe deconditioning. Her impairments include, decreased overall strength, decreased functional mobility and functional skills, and decreased cardiovascular endurance. METHODS: The patient was provided with therapeutic exercises and therapeutic activities to address impairments of overall decreases in strength, decreases in functional mobility and functional skills, and decreased cardiovascular endurance. She was treated in conjunction with her medical providers in the long-term acute care setting over the span of about five weeks, for a total of 21 treatments. She was also educated on a number of different topics relevant to her care. OUTCOMES: She demonstrated an increase in strength, functional mobility and functional skills, and cardiovascular endurance. At evaluation she was dependent with all her mobility skills, but at discharge she required stand by assistance of one person to move from supine to sit to supine, and was able to move from sit to stand to sit with minimal to moderate assistance of one person. She achieved modified independence in wheelchair management and use; and was beginning to learn pre-gait skills. DISCUSSION: It appears that physical therapy/rehabilitation therapies in conjunction with pharmaceutical therapy helped the patient achieve greater function, as well as improve her functional outcome. She remained with impairments in ability to transfer, but was accepted into an impatient rehabilitation facility to further address those impairments.

Provenance

Submitted by Melinda Anne Montoya (anne84m@salud.unm.edu) on 2014-06-25T19:24:22Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Capstone - Myoclonus.pdf: 365190 bytes, checksum: 258acfb729fcc644e760deb2894a0cc1 (MD5), Made available in DSpace on 2014-06-25T19:24:22Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Capstone - Myoclonus.pdf: 365190 bytes, checksum: 258acfb729fcc644e760deb2894a0cc1 (MD5)

Document Type

Capstone

Comments

Advisor: Ron Andrews, PT, PhD

Keywords

Myoclonus Post-Anoxic Brain Injury, Physical Therapy, Anoxic Brain Injury, Outcomes, Brain Injury Rehabilitation

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