Abstract

Abstract Background/Purpose: The purpose was to determine if Constraint Induced Movement Therapy improves motor function better than traditional rehabilitation in patients who have upper extremity dysfunction after a stroke. Case Description: Patient D was a 62 year old male seen at the Raymond G Murphy Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Albuquerque, NM. He was seen while in acute care and presented with decreased strength in his left upper extremity, coordination and functional mobility. Patient D received therapy throughout 3 visits which included functional activities, strength training and functional/task oriented training with behavior shaping techniques. Outcomes: The majority of Patient Ds long term goals were met, which included being able to transfer to his power wheelchair and demonstrated the ability to safely drive his power wheelchair 500' down hallways onto and off elevators, while safely maneuvering around obstacles. He was able to transfer to and from his wheelchair, don his shorts, drink water while holding a cup in his left hand, and don and doff his hat. His total Functional Independence Measure score improved from 44 to 54. Discussion: Research has shown that mCIMT can be beneficial for improving upper extremity dysfunction in patients during the subacute/chronic stages post stroke but many are not convincing enough to exclusively use this treatment on all patients. Many articles do not study this therapy in the acute stages post stroke and, therefore, these findings cannot be generalized to this patient.

Provenance

Submitted by Ashley Villanueva (avillanu@salud.unm.edu) on 2014-06-25T19:37:49Z No. of bitstreams: 1 CAPSTONE FINAL.pdf: 1008322 bytes, checksum: cb0edce414f703e7299716c07f30c03f (MD5), Made available in DSpace on 2014-06-25T19:37:49Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 CAPSTONE FINAL.pdf: 1008322 bytes, checksum: cb0edce414f703e7299716c07f30c03f (MD5)

Document Type

Capstone

Comments

Advisor: Marybeth Barkocy, PT, DPT

Keywords

Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy, Stroke, Motor function, Traditional physical therapy, Upper extremity dysfunction, Functional recovery

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