Abstract

Purpose: This paper investigates the use of Alexander Technique in a physical therapy setting. Method: In addition to a literature search, three people who are certified as Alexander teachers and also licensed as physical therapists were interviewed about their incorporation of Alexander Technique into physical therapy practice, and the author personally underwent a series of Alexander Technique lessons. Results: Weak to moderate level evidence was found for Alexander Technique as being helpful for Parkinson's disease symptoms and chronic low back pain. The author experienced the Alexander Technique as a gentle form of movement and posture retraining that emphasizes mindfulness and inhibition of habitual muscular tension. Several physical therapists trained in the Alexander Technique and working in physical therapy practice settings found that they directly used the Alexander Technique less than 25% of the time with their patients but incorporated principals of the Technique into their work with patients and into their awareness of personal body mechanics at work. Certification as an Alexander Teacher is a lengthy and expensive process. Conclusion: For the physical therapist working in any of the usual practice settings, the time and expense of seeking certification in Alexander Technique may not be cost\xad effective given the level of evidence of efficacy; however, several personal lessons in the Alexander Technique may be worthwhile to give interested physical therapists another view of posture training and movement re-education.

Provenance

Submitted by Dyanna Monahan (dmonahan@salud.unm.edu) on 2014-04-21T22:28:23Z No. of bitstreams: 1 2012-7.pdf: 3361282 bytes, checksum: 4fea1057dbcccef5efed6065cb8ea683 (MD5), Made available in DSpace on 2014-04-21T22:28:23Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 2012-7.pdf: 3361282 bytes, checksum: 4fea1057dbcccef5efed6065cb8ea683 (MD5)

Document Type

Capstone

Keywords

Alexander Technique, physical therapy

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