Abstract

Background: The patient studied was a 44-\xad\u2010year-\xad\u2010old male admitted to UNMH with a right vertebral artery dissection and subsequent cerebellar and occipital lobe infarcts. When referred to physical therapy the subject demonstrated cognitive, visual, and functional mobility deficits. How does one provide balance training to this individual? PICO: Does Constraint-\xad\u2010Induced Movement Therapy improve function/balance as well as or better than traditional rehabilitation interventions in someone who has had a stroke? Methods: Systematic search performed using multiple databases and search word combinations of: Stroke, Constraint-\xad\u2010Induced Movement Therapy, balance, balance training, Postural Control, Acute Stroke, Subactue Stroke. Results: Eight articles were analyzed and used to answer PICO question. One systematic review, 1 clinical review, 4 RCTs and 2 single-\xad\u2010subject designs. Conclusion: There is not enough information available to answer PICO question. The literature suggests CIMT is safe to use as an intervention in people who are within the first 6 months post-\xad\u2010stroke, CIMT is shown to be efficacious in modified dosages, and in training specific to the upper extremity in a seated position, which can positively impact gait and balance.

Provenance

Submitted by Dyanna Monahan (dmonahan@salud.unm.edu) on 2014-03-20T15:46:38Z No. of bitstreams: 1 capstoneFinalJessM.pdf: 906275 bytes, checksum: 55b3fd84b7fa2f9087b5fa343e0144b1 (MD5), Made available in DSpace on 2014-03-20T15:46:38Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 capstoneFinalJessM.pdf: 906275 bytes, checksum: 55b3fd84b7fa2f9087b5fa343e0144b1 (MD5)

Document Type

Capstone

Keywords

postural balance, stroke, blindness, gait ataxia, rehabilitation

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