Abstract

Background/purpose — Stroke is a leading cause of death in the United States. About 795,000 people have a stroke each year in the United States. Functional Electrical Stimulation cycling is a method of using electrical stimulation therapy while cycling on a stationary cycle to improve motor and sensory pathways to improve functional outcomes. The case study quantitatively evaluates the extent that the use of FES cycling may improve functional outcomes in stroke patients with hemiplegia or hemiparesis. Case Description — A 53-year-old male who was initially admitted to a local hospital with a chief complaint of severe headache, left facial weakness, left-sided hemiweakness and slurred speech after hitting his head from a fall in his home. His exam was significant for NIH stroke scale of 16, initial blood pressure of 193/117 mm Hg, and a diagnostic CT positive for stroke. The patient was transferred for a neurosurgery consult to a 2nd local hospital. Imaging showed a large ischemic hemispheric stroke in the perfusion territory of the right middle cerebral artery affecting the basal ganglia, frontal, parietal, temporal lobe. Outcomes and Discussion — At the time of discharge the patient remained a fall risk with a Berg Balance score of 5/56, was impulsive, and had decreased safety awareness and decreased cognition. He still needed moderate assistance with bed mobility, transfers, sit to stand task and ambulation. The patient did not meet any of his long-term goals including bed mobility, transfers, gait ambulation or wheel chair ambulation.

Provenance

Submitted by Dyanna Monahan (dmonahan@salud.unm.edu) on 2014-03-20T18:01:38Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Bob G.pdf: 1101604 bytes, checksum: 18b2ae5fd3c2df8e66329db1c8a04c4e (MD5), Made available in DSpace on 2014-03-20T18:01:38Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Bob G.pdf: 1101604 bytes, checksum: 18b2ae5fd3c2df8e66329db1c8a04c4e (MD5)

Document Type

Capstone

Keywords

stroke, functional electrical stimulation, hemiparesis, hemiplegia, functional outcomes

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