Abstract

The purpose of this paper was to review published research studying the effects of equine movement on function in children with Autism Disorder. More research has begun to be presented on the effects of equine movement, in the forms of hippotherapy, therapeutic horseback riding and a Simulated Developmental Horse-Riding Program in the populations of individuals with various diagnoses. Also included in this paper is a case report of a 4-year, 5-month-old male child from Skyline Therapy Services who was receiving treatment for impairments secondary to a diagnosis of Autism Disorder. The subject has been receiving services from Skyline Therapy for over 2 years and has made significant improvements in speech/language, social and motor skills through the continued used of equine movement to facilitate treatment. Although the amount of current published research is limited, the studies available do suggest positive outcomes in function of children with Autism Disorder. As the practice of using equine movement as a treatment strategy moves from being considered an alternative' strategy to a more conventional program, more extensive research can be performed and published. Based on the results of the studies reviewed in this paper, equine movement is a viable treatment strategy to improve all areas of function in children with Autism Disorder.

Provenance

Submitted by Dyanna Monahan (dmonahan@salud.unm.edu) on 2014-03-20T17:58:06Z No. of bitstreams: 1 CapstoneReena.pdf: 3610906 bytes, checksum: 327b1dd97e6d88882eafc0a6f5ef8b30 (MD5), Made available in DSpace on 2014-03-20T17:58:06Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 CapstoneReena.pdf: 3610906 bytes, checksum: 327b1dd97e6d88882eafc0a6f5ef8b30 (MD5)

Document Type

Capstone

Keywords

hippotherapy, equine movement, autism, Autism Spectrum Disorder, functional abilities

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