Abstract

Background There is substantial evidence regarding direct myofascial release and other manual therapy techniques aimed at reducing myofascial restrictions. Foam rolling is advertised as a tool capable of providing self-myofascial release'. Evidence assessing foam rolling's abilities to reduce myofascial restrictions is lacking, and the available evidence is not of substantial quality. This capstone aims to assess the literature regarding foam rolling, and compare the outcomes to higher quality studies assessing direct myofascial release through manual therapy. Case Description The patient was a 66 year old female presenting to a Veteran's Affairs Medical Center (VA) in New Mexico. Her chief complaint was right groin and buttock pain. She had unrestricted lumbar range of motion, no neurological symptoms, and right hip joint mobility limited by muscle tightness and pain. She also presented with palpable myofascial restrictions in the lumbar spine and right psoas and gluteal muscles, which was the most likely cause of her pain. She was seen for a total of 4 visits over 6 weeks. Her treatment consisted of manual therapy, a home stretching program, and foam rolling. Outcomes The patient's symptoms significantly decreased after 4 treatments and she was able to resume most of her previous activities without being limited by pain. She was instructed on proper use of a foam roller prior to discharge, and was issued a foam roller by the VA to continue addressing her significantly decreased painful symptoms upon discharge, in addition to continuing her home stretching program Discussion An evidence based literature review was performed to address the limited research available on foam rolling, and compare it to direct myofascial release techniques used to reduce myofascial restrictions. Direct myofascial release was defined as applying force and mechanical stress to palpable tissue restrictions in order to decrease the density of the fascia and reduce restrictions. Foam rolling can be used to roll over restricted tissues to apply a mechanical stress, using the patient's own body weight as the force, making it similar to the manual techniques being utilized in physical therapy The available research shows that foam rolling can reduce pain and increase range of motion, however further, high-quality research needs to be done to examine the legitimacy behind the practice of foam rolling being used to perform self-myofascial release of soft tissue restrictions.

Provenance

Submitted by Tracy Mae Mechenbier (tmechenbier@salud.unm.edu) on 2015-06-23T03:40:59Z No. of bitstreams: 2 TMechenbier_Capstone.pdf: 1051401 bytes, checksum: 9e54bda5ec2bb628a57d866dc64d20b4 (MD5) TMechenbier_Poster.pdf: 940800 bytes, checksum: 9db6c21afa03ff4674fd07fab07d432d (MD5), Made available in DSpace on 2015-06-23T03:40:59Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 TMechenbier_Capstone.pdf: 1051401 bytes, checksum: 9e54bda5ec2bb628a57d866dc64d20b4 (MD5) TMechenbier_Poster.pdf: 940800 bytes, checksum: 9db6c21afa03ff4674fd07fab07d432d (MD5) Previous issue date: 2015-06

Document Type

Capstone

Comments

Advisor: Ron Andrews, PT, PhD

Keywords

Foam rolling, myofascial release, myofascial restrictions, self-myofascial release

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