Abstract

Purpose: This case study and evidence-based analysis aims to determine the effects of resistance training compared to aerobic activity on cancer-related fatigue and quality of life in patients who are currently diagnosed or are survivors of breast cancer. Background: It is estimated that there were more than 3.1 million women living in the United States with a history of invasive breast cancer as of January 1, 2014, and an additional 232,670 women were newly diagnosed throughout the year. However, The overall 5-year relative survival rate for female breast cancer patients has improved from 75% between 1975 to 1977 to 90% for 2003 through 2009. While the survival rate is rising due to the improvements in treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy, the effects of cancer-related fatigue in these patients is also rising, significantly impacting their quality of life. Physical activity has been proposed as a safe and effective intervention for symptom management and improvement in overall quality of life in breast cancer patients; however, more long-term research studies need to be conducted to determine the single most effective form of physical activity on cancer-related fatigue. Case Description: The patient selected for this case study and analysis is a 46-year-old female with metastatic breast cancer and widespread metastases to the skeleton, admitted to DYouville Center for Advanced Therapy for a total femur and partial hip replacement. The physical therapy for this patient was controversial, as total hip precautions, bone integrity, and significant level of fatigue impacted the proposed treatment plan and therefore the outcomes for this patient cannot support the purpose of this case analysis as resistance training was not included in therapy. However, had this patient not had metastases to the skeleton, she would have been a good candidate for resistance training in addition to aerobic activity. Outcomes: A review of current literature revealed that a combination of both resistance training and high intensity interval aerobic activity is the most effective form of physical activity on cancer-related fatigue and quality of life in breast cancer patients. Discussion: The overall quality of current research is relatively good, however it is consisting mostly of research with very little long-term follow-up. The literary review revealed that a combination of aerobic and resistance exercise is the most optimal and beneficial treatment plan for improvement of body composition, fatigue, and overall quality of life in cancer patients and survivors. Aerobic exercise, both land-based and water-based, has been shown to maintain effects six months following intervention. Resistance exercise has been shown to improve body composition and therefore improve overall quality of life. Exercise training appears to be safe for most cancer patients and improvements in physiological, psychological, and functional parameters can be attained with regular participation in moderate intensity exercise. The results of all of the recent studies are promising and affirming, but clearly warrant further and more extensive investigations to accurately determine the most effective intervention for improving overall quality of life in cancer survivors.

Provenance

Submitted by Elaina Diane Kapuranis (ekapuran@salud.unm.edu) on 2015-06-11T14:58:08Z No. of bitstreams: 2 Kapuranis capstone.pdf: 2353799 bytes, checksum: 13d3be179d5ef1f93520cd0db99c1d48 (MD5) Kapuranis poster.pdf: 629669 bytes, checksum: aed27128048af407bb9a4ad1e3ba4ad1 (MD5), Made available in DSpace on 2015-06-11T14:58:08Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 Kapuranis capstone.pdf: 2353799 bytes, checksum: 13d3be179d5ef1f93520cd0db99c1d48 (MD5) Kapuranis poster.pdf: 629669 bytes, checksum: aed27128048af407bb9a4ad1e3ba4ad1 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2015-06-11

Document Type

Capstone

Comments

Advisor: Tiffany Pelletier, P.T., Lecturer II and Director of Clinical Education

Keywords

breast cancer, aerobic exercise, resistive exercise, fatigue

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