Publication Date

5-1-2013

Abstract

Synthesis and interpretation of archaeologically documented land-use patterns and ethnographic data are used to identify and model where people chose to live, hunt, and gather prehistorically. This project tests the hypothesis that the archaeological record of SE Alaska extends to areas of the continental shelf that were submerged by post-Pleistocene sea level rise beginning around 10,600 cal years BP (9,400 14C years). Digital elevation models (DEM) and sea-level curve for southeastern Alaska are used to create time slices between 16,000 to 10,500 cal BP. The variables (slope, aspect, distance from paleo-stream, paleo-lakes, paleo-coastlines, and known archaeological sites, and coastal sinuosity) included in the predictive model are incorporated in model identifying high potential areas for archeological sites. This model has been used to delineate survey areas for underwater archaeological surveys during two fields and will be used for two more field season.

Keywords

underwater archaeology, marine geophysics, Alaska

Sponsors

National Science Foundation

Document Type

Dissertation

Language

English

Degree Name

Anthropology

Level of Degree

Doctoral

Department Name

UNM Department of Anthropology

First Advisor

Dixon, E. James

First Committee Member (Chair)

Graves, Michael W.

Second Committee Member

Dinwoodie, David

Third Committee Member

Benedict, Karl

Fourth Committee Member

Meyer, Grant

Included in

Anthropology Commons

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